Tuesday, September 4, 2007

Services to teens shouldn't be considered outside a library's normal mission!

In his article Connecting Young Adults and Libraries in the 21st Century, Patrick Jones writes:

Libraries often view services to teens, including collecting graphic formats, as special and outside of their normal mission. What this demonstrates is a radical inconsistency towards changing formats to meet the changing needs of our users. One example - most public libraries purchase large print books. They do so primarily to meet the needs of one user segment, seniors...A second example - most public libraries purchase board books. They do so primarily to meet the needs of two market segments, babies and toddlers.

Jones, Patrick. Connecting Young Adults and Libraries in the 21st Century. Aplis 20(2) June 2007. A pdf of this article can be accessed through the EBSCO database.

1 comments:

Tina said...

I was just reading your posting, and I'm glad that my library (way up north here!) actually is totally different. Not only do they purchase board books, and some large print, but recently, a space has been made in the centre of the adult section (near the young adult book spinners) specifically for comic books and graphic novels. In addition, we are lucky enough to have a librarian who will run separate book clubs for young men and women.